1 February 2008

JAYNE CORTEZ AND THE FIRESPITTERS - THERE IT IS





















Jayne Cortez and the Firespitters for Bola Press from 1982.

Jayne Cortez (voice) and The Firespitters - Abraham Adzinyah(conga), Bill Cole(shenai, flute, muzette, korean sona), Denardo Coleman(drums), Farel Johnson Jr.(bongo, bell, conga), Charles Moffett Jr.(tenor saxophone), Bern Nix(guitar), Jamaaladeen Tacuma(electric bass).

A pretty unique fusion of poetry,jazz and blues best known for the fantastic eulogy to the mighty Chano Pozo "I See Chano Pozo" a percussion heavy,rumbling bass driven chanting monster of a track with Cortez in full effect with her spoken word tribute to the conga king.

"I have read my poetry with some really great musicians," Jayne Cortez recently allowed. "I think, though, that my poetry swings with or without music." There’s much evidence to support this claim. For at least the past 30 years, Cortez has been an avatar of rhythmic agility in verse. Like her contemporary Amiri Baraka, she absorbed not only the techniques of an American poetic avant-garde but also the language(s) of the blues. The resulting poems translate the pulsation of the city into potent phraseology; they rumble, they smolder, they swing. All of which makes sense, given the poet’s singular history. Born in Arizona and raised in California, Cortez graduated from an arts high school, where she forged an identity as a writer and cellist. In 1954, at the age of 18, she married the iconoclastic saxophonist Ornette Coleman; two years later, they had a child. During the ’60s, Cortez struck out on her own — working for civil rights in Mississippi, organizing writing workshops in Watts, touring both Europe and Africa and finally emigrating to New York. She published her first book of poems in 1969. Cortez was for some time deeply invested in the ideology of the Black Arts Movement, and her work still conveys both political urgency and poetical rage. It also frequently address issues of feminism — or, perhaps more accurately, the complex matrices of womanhood.
Ripped from the original vinyl @320-no reissues



13 comments:

ish said...

Hey thanks for this. Can't wait to listen.

bobhowe said...

I'm a sucker for spoken word and jazz this looks interesting. Thanks

Tobias Funke said...

This post really put a smile on my face - been meaning to pick this up for "I see Chano Pozo" since, oh, the early 90's, but the LP never seemed to come around that often. Passed on it an age back and that one bloody song has been nagging at me on and off ever since! Glad I can finally put this one to rest - thanks!

bayviewsax-lostsoul.blogspot.com said...

Awesome post! I love JC, she spits it like it needs to be spat!

La Otra Gente said...

Thank you so much. There's two total killers on this... If Your Drum was a Woman's a monster, if I remember rightly. Fantastic record.

Andy said...

i have searched for this since seeing her perform in "Poetry in Motion" back in '82

thanks alot!

ghostrancedance said...

Thank you! This one will clear the cobwebs out of your brain for sure...

db said...

great music! check out
calisoulbrother records
for rare jazz, soul & funk records!

ish said...

I just posted "Celebrations and Solitudes," her album on Strata-East, over at Ile Oxumare. Enjoy! http://ileoxumare.blogspot.com/2008/04/poetry-of-jayne-cortez-celebrations-and.html

peskypesky said...

tres cool!

peskypesky said...

as someone elee posted, i too am a sucker for poetry and jazz, so i really hope more gems like these are dug up and spread through the internet.

taro nombei said...

thanks so much bacoso,
TN

closed said...

no link? thanks!