27 September 2006

THE MOOD IS MODAL























WHAT IS MODAL JAZZ-A COUPLE OF DESCRIPTIONS:
An approach to jazz in which the chord changes (harmonic rhythm) move at a much slower rate than is usually heard in bebop, swing, or hot jazz. Often, modal jazz performances move back and forth between only two chords based on a mode, or on a drone or pedal point.
Modal jazz often has an impressionistic, meditative feeling. Its use of slow chord changes can free musicians to experiment with melody and rhythm
OR
The term 'modal jazz' - whilst not adhering strictly to the correct rules laid down by musicologists and jazz purists-has come to define a certain type of jazz record.
Tracks labeled as being 'Modal' generally have an exotic, eastern feel and/or have an unusual time signature or are in waltz time.

So here's my compilation of modal jazz tunes-I played free and easy with this as a genre (so you may not agree with my inclusions) and tried to keep it to music that's not quite so obvious and a little harder to find.Only Half and Half has been posted here before as part of my Impulse series.
If you need any more info on the tracks leave a comment in the box.

1.NAOSUKE MIYAMOTO-ONE FOR TRANE 2.WALT DICKERSON-DEATH AND TAXES 3.PAVANNE-JAMES CLAY 4.PETERS WALTZ-SAHIB SHIHAB 5.CYCLES-PAUL HORN 6.LOVE THEME FROM SPARTACUS-YUSEF LATEEF 7.25 1/2 DAZE-JOHNNY GRIFFIN 8.HALF AND HALF-ELVIN JONES 9.THE FAKIR-DUKE PEARSON 10.MODE FOR JOE-JOE HENDERSON 11.EPISTLE TO TRANE-SONNY SIMMONDS/PRINCE LASHA 12.DUDLEY MOORE-AMALGAM

This is a big file as my latest posts are now ripped @ 256.

9 comments:

Directional Mike said...

Hi, and thanks for all your hard work on this blog!

I haven't downloaded your modal selections yet, but I'm responding to the term "modal jazz." From my understanding of the theory--I've studied some, but it's not my livlihood--it's based on a scale of notes that emphasizes as it's root or "home" tone a note other than the "usual" or expected one in the scale. In other words: using a major C scale but emphasizing D as the home tone puts the music in a "Dorian" tonal mode. (An ordinary d minor scale would sometimes include a C#, but the dorian scale would not.) The listener's ear might still want to hear C as the home tone, but the musician/composer emphasizes the D through the use of devices such as repetition or an unusual time signature, etc.

There. I said it. Sorry. I know how boring theory is. Let's just listen to your selections.

Thanks again.
- Mike

141743rd said...

My dictionary defines it as a ...1) physical representation of an actual object; 2) person who demonstrates how wonderful expensive clothes will look on you. Huh, Oh I see! MODAL, not MODEL..'scuse me (ahem.) Sorry, my mistake.

(still, it's a great blog!)

Directional Mike said...

To 141743rd:

I like your definition.

141743rd said...

To Directional Mike:

Appreciated your info! I remember reading that Miles (Davis, not Buddy) said he liked to begin his solos on the 9th (note of the scale -- not of the month) because he felt that from there he could take it in any direction he wanted to go. This falls in with your stated "...using a major C scale but emphasizing D as the home tone puts the music in a "Dorian" tonal mode." He's just jacking the D an octave up. Makes sense, seeing how much modal stuff he did.

- 43rd

shakeyjake said...

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Reza said...

Bacoso , your music has changed my life too, no more listening to Dirty Dancing any more :|

ZubZub said...

Another fine fine post - thank you sir!

marmelzod said...

I'd love to hear this if anyone would repost.
THANKS!

cvllos said...

Dear friend, I have just seen this issue about Modal Jazz. And this stile is important for our Jazz knowledge. Would you mind to repost the selection you made?